Spring Cleaning: No Mops Required

It’s officially spring, which means it’s also time for a little spring cleaning. Here are a few suggestions that will vastly improve the comfort of your home in one afternoon’s worth of work.

BY MYFIRSTAPARTMENT

Whether you’re in your first condo or your dream home, here are a few suggestions that will vastly improve the comfort of your home in one afternoon’s worth of work.

Organize and clean the refrigerator

Do you have three almost empty bottles of mustard and some long-expired eggs in your fridge? How about those Mexican leftovers from a month ago? Go through your fridge and toss what’s no longer edible. Then, if you want to go the extra mile (or if the fridge literally stinks) actually clean it. And don’t forget the freezer section while you’re at it.

Edit your clothes

Even if it seems like you have the right amount of clothes, you may have much more than you think. In fact, it’s not uncommon for someone to give away 20 pounds of clothing after going through their closets. Get out all of your clothes and consider how long it’s been since you’ve worn each article. Often, items at the very bottom of your dresser or back of your closet haven’t been used in several seasons. If you haven’t missed these pieces yet, you likely never will. Give them away, or throw them out, as the case may be. By doing so, you’ll finally have room for the clothes you actually wear.

Get rid of ‘the pile’

Have a box or two that you never bothered unpacking after your last move, or a stack of “important papers” that is making a mess of your desk? How about a stash of old CDs or video games shoved under the bed? Go through them. Toss what you don’t need, save and organize what you do, and be glad to be done with it. Who knows, you might find something you’d been vaguely searching for but had given up as lost. As for those old video games: You might be able to convert them into a little bit of cash online.

Don’t be a product hoarder

Now, go through all the products and cosmetics in your medicine cabinet and bathroom shelves. Throw out everything that you are not currently using — even if it was expensive — or that is clearly past its “use by” date. And while you are in the bathroom, look at the shower curtain liner. Is it greenish? Then it’s time to get a new one.

Sprucing up your home doesn’t have to be painful. If you cannot do the entire cleanup in one day, tackle one or two things at a time. You’ll feel better about your place and ready for the new season.

JUST LISTED- 1505, 111 10th Street SW

Executive condo in show suite condition! Breathtaking 180° views of downtown through the floor-to-ceiling windows that span the entire unit. This is the largest and most sought after 1 bedroom and den floorplan. The chef’s kitchen has Fisher & Paykel stainless steel appliances, a hidden pantry and plenty of quartz counter space. Providing a wonderful environment for gatherings and entertaining. Upgrades throughout. Including brand new luxury carpet, wired 5.1 surround sound, A/C, and roller blinds. The master bedroom retreat has a walk-through closet into your stunning spa-like bathroom. This bathroom has a stand-alone glass walk-in shower and separate soaker tub. Laundry is hidden in there too! There is a defined storage room for all your needs, and a built-in workspace. This building offers top notch amenities, including concierge service, a fitness center, lounge, guest suites, and secure underground titled parking. Urban living at its very best, only steps from everything you desire. 

 

Virtual Tour

 

Beltline

 

5 Tips for Home Sellers This Spring

As the housing market heats up and more homes become available, sellers need to do everything they can to stand out.

BY ALEXA FIANDER

It’s spring, which is the traditional start of the home shopping season. And as the housing market heats up and more homes become available, sellers need to do everything they can to stand out.

Curb appeal

A strong first impression is imperative as buyers begin making assumptions about a home well before they step inside.  “A clean entrance can go a long way at establishing a positive first impression,” says Zillow Agent Advisory Board member, Cyndi Lesinski of Valencia, CA. Whether you’re adding a pot of plants to the porch, or a fresh coat of paint to the front door, small, inexpensive updates to your curb appeal can really “increase the life and energy of the entrance,” says Lesinski.

Staging

Staging a home is a great way to attract buyers and help them envision themselves in the home. The goal is to make “your home appeal to the broadest audience and number of buyers possible,” says Zillow Digs Board of Designers member Mara Miller of Carrier and Company in New York City. Remove all personal belongings and avoid colors or furniture that are too style-specific. “Attempting to “decorate” may not be the best use of your time and dollars,” says Miller.

Invest in small home improvements

Both agents and designers agree that sellers should never invest in a major renovation before selling. No matter how out-of-date your home is, “major renovations prior to sale usually will not equal a dollar for dollar return, and the time invested outweighs selling it faster,” says Zillow Agent Advisory Board member Chris Speicher, of The Speicher Group and RE/MAX in Washington, D.C. Instead, focus on small projects such as updating your lighting fixtures, cabinet or door handles, or minor kitchen and bathroom updates.

Declutter

This sounds simple, but according to Zillow experts, cleaning and decluttering are the most important things a homeowner should do before selling. A clean house feels more spacious and helps buyers easily envision themselves in the home. “Nothing trumps the aesthetic of a clean and cared-for home,” says Zillow Digs Board of Designers member Kerrie Kelly of Kerrie Kelly Design Lab in Sacramento, CA. “Old appliances and furniture can be overlooked if a space is clean, simple and well-edited.”

Granite countertops and stainless steel appliances

Most buyers are still requesting “granite countertops and stainless steel appliances,” says Zillow Agent Advisory Board member Bic DeCaro. Keep in mind that most “high-end finishes don’t equal high-end returns,” says DeCaro. But in many markets, incorporating granite and new appliances are great ways to catch a buyer’s eye.

JUST LISTED- 528 Willacy Drive SE

Amazing opportunity to live on a quiet, tree-lined street in one of the best neighbourhoods! This sprawling home has over 2700 sqft of developed space, with 7 bedrooms & 4 bathrooms. Loads of “elbow room” for your large, growing or multi-generational family. Entering the home, you are greeted by vaulted ceilings, stunning staircase, an eye catching stone fireplace & gleaming hardwood floors throughout. The kitchen was opened & redone with a huge quartz island & a gas range. Entertaining would be a joy in this home. The upper level has three bedrooms & a main 4pc bathroom, the large master has it’s own 3pc ensuite. The lower level was freshly painted & features a great rec room, an updated 3pc bathroom with steam shower & a large bedroom. The basement level has 3 more bedrooms, all with egress windows, another family room & a small kitchenette. Gorgeous landscaping, interlocking brick walkways, new composite deck, & a heated double detached garage. This home is everything you have been waiting for!

 

Virtual Tour

 

Willacy

Oakridge Townhouse

JUST LISTED : #402, 9803 24 Street SW

Renovated townhouse in Oakridge with the all the modern finishes and space that you want at the price you need!

This functional three bedroom, 1 and a half bathroom townhouse is exactly what you have been dreaming of. Everything is brand new!! This townhouse is timeless and on trend! There is an open concept kitchen with Samsung S/S appliances, stone countertops and modern cabinets with striking pops of black hardware. Both bathrooms have new vanities, fixtures and toilets. The main bath also has a new bathtub. There is a large master bedroom with an oversized closet and two other good-sized bedrooms.

Wait, there is more… a finished basement family room, new laundry pair and even more storage. Fresh new carpet and luxury vinyl plank flooring throughout. Professionally painted in muted neutrals, with all new ceiling texture. And every “big ticket” item has been done – roof, windows, exterior, and furnace. This home has a sunny west facing backyard and a parking spot steps from your entrance.

For more information visit the virtual tour

Oakridge Townhouse Oakridge Townhouse

Oakridge Townhouse Oakridge Townhouse

8 Approaches to Mid-Century Modern Design

If you’re among those attracted to streamlined and minimalistic style, there are ways to incorporate these touches into your home without a total remodel.

BY TALI WEE

The TV show “Mad Men” has not only earned widespread praise and dozens of awards, it’s also inspired a renaissance for mid-century modern design. If you’re among those attracted to streamlined and minimalistic style, there are ways to incorporate these touches into your home without a total remodel.

Mid-century modern describes an era of style and design that began in the mid-1940s and continued into the mid-1960s. At the time, architecture was greatly influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright’s environmental focus and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s functional structures. Most of these homes included expansive windows, open layouts and materials such as glass, wood, metal and concrete.

Interiors complemented the architecture with furniture made of natural resources and sleek, modern plastic accessories — think egg chairs, bubble lamps, tulip tables and geometric-shaped, low-slung furniture. Each piece had a function, and lines were clean and simple.

As cyclical styles re-emerge, they’re often paired with contemporary elements to bridge the time lapse. Here are tips from eight designers who are successfully incorporating mid-century modern touches into their designs:

1. Fresh texture

Emily Henderson, a frontrunner in mid-century modern style and a designer featured on HGTV, advocates white-painted walls and no more than five accent hues per room. Her designs are asymmetrical and full of texture. One highlight is her trademark inclusion of plants. The punch of rich green works effortlessly with her mod finishes.

2. Budget antiques

Designer and blogger Carrie Waller mastered 1960s decor with retro patterns and lamps, all while on budget. Her takeaway advice is to wait for the perfect piece. She decorated her home by perusing estate sales, collecting old brass animals and other iconic accents.

3. Clean simplicity

Blogger and event planner Camille Styles offers expertise across numerous design styles, but often incorporates mid-century modern touches into her projects. The design for her new office space is focused on function, with minimal furniture, closed storage for clean lines and ample lighting. She opts for soothing neutral hues with pops of color.

4. Planned vision

Designer Darlene Weir is function-focused and says envisioning a plan is the key to any successful design. Having a specific vision before she ever begins a design project enables her to avoid clutter from the outset. Her mid-century modern flair is reflected through her choice of furniture. Whether paired with cottage or contemporary styles, Weir’s chairs and sofas are true 1960s design inspiration.

5. Statement piece

Vintage furniture helps ground Erin Gates’ mid-century modern rooms. The designer uses just one statement piece per room and allows that single piece to inspire the rest of the furniture and accent choices within the space. Because vintage elements can get expensive, splurging for a single statement item is a cost-effective method for successful styling.

6. Eclectic layers

Designer Kristin Jackson prefers to blend eclectic design with mid-century modern style for a layered look. A room that features wood accessories only, for instance, is not nearly as interesting as one that layers elements such as wood, metal, fresh flowers, antique lamps, brass accents and retro patterns. Before making any big investments, she suggests shopping your own home. Rearrange your decor to expose the perfect accents for the greatest design impact.

7. Researched history

Curious about the history of one of your vintage pieces? Suzanne and Lauren McGrath are the authors of “Good Bones, Great Pieces: The 7 Essential Pieces That Will Carry You Through a Lifetime.” The mother-daughter design team takes a special interest in the origin of the pieces they include in their designs, noting that understanding history helps dictate how retro pieces best pair with contemporary designs. Their style features tasteful, practical combinations of low-slung tables, retro patterns and saddle chairs.

8. Balanced pairing

Interior designer and blogger Samantha Penner is known for her ability to combine mid-century modern flair with elegant contemporary styling. She effortlessly adds antique bar carts and Milo Baughman chairs for a look that’s chic without looking like it belongs in a museum.

8 Approaches to Mid-Century Modern Design

If you’re among those attracted to streamlined and minimalistic style, there are ways to incorporate these touches into your home without a total remodel.

BY TALI WEE

The TV show “Mad Men” has not only earned widespread praise and dozens of awards, it’s also inspired a renaissance for mid-century modern design. If you’re among those attracted to streamlined and minimalistic style, there are ways to incorporate these touches into your home without a total remodel.

Mid-century modern describes an era of style and design that began in the mid-1940s and continued into the mid-1960s. At the time, architecture was greatly influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright’s environmental focus and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s functional structures. Most of these homes included expansive windows, open layouts and materials such as glass, wood, metal and concrete.

Interiors complemented the architecture with furniture made of natural resources and sleek, modern plastic accessories — think egg chairs, bubble lamps, tulip tables and geometric-shaped, low-slung furniture. Each piece had a function, and lines were clean and simple.

As cyclical styles re-emerge, they’re often paired with contemporary elements to bridge the time lapse. Here are tips from eight designers who are successfully incorporating mid-century modern touches into their designs:

1. Fresh texture

Emily Henderson, a frontrunner in mid-century modern style and a designer featured on HGTV, advocates white-painted walls and no more than five accent hues per room. Her designs are asymmetrical and full of texture. One highlight is her trademark inclusion of plants. The punch of rich green works effortlessly with her mod finishes.

2. Budget antiques

Designer and blogger Carrie Waller mastered 1960s decor with retro patterns and lamps, all while on budget. Her takeaway advice is to wait for the perfect piece. She decorated her home by perusing estate sales, collecting old brass animals and other iconic accents.

3. Clean simplicity

Blogger and event planner Camille Styles offers expertise across numerous design styles, but often incorporates mid-century modern touches into her projects. The design for her new office space is focused on function, with minimal furniture, closed storage for clean lines and ample lighting. She opts for soothing neutral hues with pops of color.

4. Planned vision

Designer Darlene Weir is function-focused and says envisioning a plan is the key to any successful design. Having a specific vision before she ever begins a design project enables her to avoid clutter from the outset. Her mid-century modern flair is reflected through her choice of furniture. Whether paired with cottage or contemporary styles, Weir’s chairs and sofas are true 1960s design inspiration.

5. Statement piece

Vintage furniture helps ground Erin Gates’ mid-century modern rooms. The designer uses just one statement piece per room and allows that single piece to inspire the rest of the furniture and accent choices within the space. Because vintage elements can get expensive, splurging for a single statement item is a cost-effective method for successful styling.

6. Eclectic layers

Designer Kristin Jackson prefers to blend eclectic design with mid-century modern style for a layered look. A room that features wood accessories only, for instance, is not nearly as interesting as one that layers elements such as wood, metal, fresh flowers, antique lamps, brass accents and retro patterns. Before making any big investments, she suggests shopping your own home. Rearrange your decor to expose the perfect accents for the greatest design impact.

7. Researched history

Curious about the history of one of your vintage pieces? Suzanne and Lauren McGrath are the authors of “Good Bones, Great Pieces: The 7 Essential Pieces That Will Carry You Through a Lifetime.” The mother-daughter design team takes a special interest in the origin of the pieces they include in their designs, noting that understanding history helps dictate how retro pieces best pair with contemporary designs. Their style features tasteful, practical combinations of low-slung tables, retro patterns and saddle chairs.

8. Balanced pairing

Interior designer and blogger Samantha Penner is known for her ability to combine mid-century modern flair with elegant contemporary styling. She effortlessly adds antique bar carts and Milo Baughman chairs for a look that’s chic without looking like it belongs in a museum.

Calgary Home and Garden Show

Ask us… again!

After an amazingly epic time at the Calgary Home and Garden Show in 2018, Renee and I are headed back to the show again this year to answer all of your Mortgage and Real Estate related questions.

Don’t miss checking out our booth and entering to win this years give away!! A $200 gift certificate to the Kananaskis Nordic Spa and a night at the Pomeroy Kananaskis Mountain Lodge! AHHHH! Do we really have to give it away Renee??? I want to go myself!

Here are the official details!

In partnership with Renée Huse of MMG MORTGAGE, I will be at the 2019 Calgary Home and Garden Show from February 28th -March 3rd, 2019 providing on the fly real estate market analyses and mortgage advice.

Ask Me: Renée Huse, Mortgage Agent

With a business rooted in honesty and integrity, Renee’s goal to be the trusted mortgage partner for your family, friends and community.  With access to over 70 lenders, Renee offers products tailored to meet your specific needs at the best rates.

www.reneehuse.com

Ask Me: Monique Morrison, YYC Red Shoe Realtor

Working with a positive outlook, Monique enhances the real estate experience with an honest, knowledgeable and collaborative commitment to you.  Together you’ll the perfect place to call HOME.
www.moniquemorrison.com

Purchase your show tickets early to receive a discount by clicking the image below!

https://calgaryhomeandgardenshow.tix123.com/

 

5 Design Tips to Cure ‘Model Home Syndrome’

Looking for a new home with all the modern amenities, but wish you could maintain that old-home feel? These budget-friendly tricks are easy to implement but can have a lasting impact on the character of your home.

BY BOBVILA.COM

Most homes built in the U.S. these days are done by developers, which can be great — contractor-built homes are energy efficient, contain the latest features and technologies, and look brand new! But depending on your taste, that brand-new look can be awesome… or totally bland.

So if you want all the benefits of contemporary living but prefer an old-home feel, check out these tips for adding some architectural details to give a new house lots of character.

No. 1: Install (lots of) architectural molding

Built-in decorative features are an almost guaranteed escape from “model home syndrome.” Crown molding, ceiling coffers, baseboards, chair rails, transoms, cornice molding, wainscoting and recessed panels all impart new drywall with loads of vintage charm. Note: The earlier you install molding in a new house the better, as walls and floors are likely to become less square over time.

No. 2: Change up your cabinet pulls

You know what they didn’t have in the days of antique houses? Brushed aluminum and acrylic. So you know what you should replace in your house? The same! In your kitchen and bathroom, consider using glass knobs, which came to popularity in the early 1900s (when metal was in short supply due to the Great Depression and world wars). To echo the look throughout your home, do the same with your door knobs, desk-drawer handles and dresser pulls.

No. 3: Address your staircase

Consider replacing the handrails and newel post with more elegant woodwork. Check local salvage yards, classified ads and online sites to snag pieces that will make an impression. And if you really want to go for it, rip up your wall-to-wall carpeting and install a stair runner for a signature-antique look.

No. 4: Upgrade your light switch and outlet plates

For very little time and money, you can easily upgrade all your switch plates and outlet covers. Look for nickel and brass finishes to stay era-appropriate. You can check antique shops if you’re a purist, but there are plenty of reproduction pieces that’ll do just fine.

No. 5: Switch up your lights

Nothing screams contractor-built home like contractor-grade lighting. Though energy-smart and inexpensive, such fixtures make everything look as generic as can be. Neutrality is the goal when you’re trying to entice buyers, not when you want to create a beautiful space. Look for antiques like chandeliers — but old wiring can be problematic, so consider reproductions. Wall sconces especially will evoke the era you’re after.

Buyer's

2019 – The Year Of The Buyer’s Advantage

I spent this morning at the 2019 CREB Forecast and Tradeshow and the message we got was…. Buyer’s Market.  There are still early signs of more inventory hitting the market and prices decreasing again. Oh… man….. But there also appeared to be light at the end of the tunnel with comments like “the amount of oversupply should start to ease by the end of the year” and “net migration gains in 2019 will help chip away at some of the oversupply”.

Overall, what does all this mean?! BUY NOW! Lol, just kidding but for those considering ownership, further resale price declines can make this year very attractive. Investors and those looking to up-size could also benefit from this buyer’s market. For now, I will put the press release below with a link to the full package of statistics, but if you want to talk specifics (neighbourhood and home style) – give me a call!

 

MEDIA RELEASE: Economic challenges to affect Calgary’s housing market in 2019

Calgary, Jan. 30, 2019 –

The challenging economic climate in Calgary is expected to persist into 2019.

Easing global oil prices, concerns regarding market access and easing investment activity are weighing on the energy sector and are expected to slow growth prospects in the province this year.

“Slowing growth, weak job prospects and lack of confidence are all factors that are contributing to the expected easing in sales activity this year,” said Ann-Marie Lurie, CREB® Chief Economist.

“At the same time, our market continues to struggle with high inventory levels and further potential rate hikes, all of which is expected to cause additional price declines this year.”

There are signs that supply in the market is starting to adjust to slower sales, but the pace of adjustment is expected to be slow. Overall, it will help reduce some oversupply in the market and put the industry in a more stable position by 2020.

Buyers’ market conditions are expected to persist throughout most of the year, impacting prices across all property types. However, the pace of decline is expected to ease by the end of the year, as concerns over the economy ease.

While further easing in the housing market is expected, this will not likely be the case for all price ranges, as demand for affordable product is expected to continue to improve, given shifts in lending requirements and adjustments in expectations.

“In this market, buyers have the advantage of choice. A REALTOR® can help buyers find a home that best fits their lifestyle,” said Alan Tennant, CREB® CEO.

“For home sellers, knowing all the data and facts surrounding their home is critical to maximize their selling price. Working with a real estate professional can take the guess work out of the process.”

Click here for the full 2019 Calgary Economic & Housing Outlook report.