Calgary Home and Garden Show

Ask us… again!

After an amazingly epic time at the Calgary Home and Garden Show in 2018, Renee and I are headed back to the show again this year to answer all of your Mortgage and Real Estate related questions.

Don’t miss checking out our booth and entering to win this years give away!! A $200 gift certificate to the Kananaskis Nordic Spa and a night at the Pomeroy Kananaskis Mountain Lodge! AHHHH! Do we really have to give it away Renee??? I want to go myself!

Here are the official details!

In partnership with Renée Huse of MMG MORTGAGE, I will be at the 2019 Calgary Home and Garden Show from February 28th -March 3rd, 2019 providing on the fly real estate market analyses and mortgage advice.

Ask Me: Renée Huse, Mortgage Agent

With a business rooted in honesty and integrity, Renee’s goal to be the trusted mortgage partner for your family, friends and community.  With access to over 70 lenders, Renee offers products tailored to meet your specific needs at the best rates.

www.reneehuse.com

Ask Me: Monique Morrison, YYC Red Shoe Realtor

Working with a positive outlook, Monique enhances the real estate experience with an honest, knowledgeable and collaborative commitment to you.  Together you’ll the perfect place to call HOME.
www.moniquemorrison.com

Purchase your show tickets early to receive a discount by clicking the image below!

https://calgaryhomeandgardenshow.tix123.com/

 

5 Design Tips to Cure ‘Model Home Syndrome’

Looking for a new home with all the modern amenities, but wish you could maintain that old-home feel? These budget-friendly tricks are easy to implement but can have a lasting impact on the character of your home.

BY BOBVILA.COM

Most homes built in the U.S. these days are done by developers, which can be great — contractor-built homes are energy efficient, contain the latest features and technologies, and look brand new! But depending on your taste, that brand-new look can be awesome… or totally bland.

So if you want all the benefits of contemporary living but prefer an old-home feel, check out these tips for adding some architectural details to give a new house lots of character.

No. 1: Install (lots of) architectural molding

Built-in decorative features are an almost guaranteed escape from “model home syndrome.” Crown molding, ceiling coffers, baseboards, chair rails, transoms, cornice molding, wainscoting and recessed panels all impart new drywall with loads of vintage charm. Note: The earlier you install molding in a new house the better, as walls and floors are likely to become less square over time.

No. 2: Change up your cabinet pulls

You know what they didn’t have in the days of antique houses? Brushed aluminum and acrylic. So you know what you should replace in your house? The same! In your kitchen and bathroom, consider using glass knobs, which came to popularity in the early 1900s (when metal was in short supply due to the Great Depression and world wars). To echo the look throughout your home, do the same with your door knobs, desk-drawer handles and dresser pulls.

No. 3: Address your staircase

Consider replacing the handrails and newel post with more elegant woodwork. Check local salvage yards, classified ads and online sites to snag pieces that will make an impression. And if you really want to go for it, rip up your wall-to-wall carpeting and install a stair runner for a signature-antique look.

No. 4: Upgrade your light switch and outlet plates

For very little time and money, you can easily upgrade all your switch plates and outlet covers. Look for nickel and brass finishes to stay era-appropriate. You can check antique shops if you’re a purist, but there are plenty of reproduction pieces that’ll do just fine.

No. 5: Switch up your lights

Nothing screams contractor-built home like contractor-grade lighting. Though energy-smart and inexpensive, such fixtures make everything look as generic as can be. Neutrality is the goal when you’re trying to entice buyers, not when you want to create a beautiful space. Look for antiques like chandeliers — but old wiring can be problematic, so consider reproductions. Wall sconces especially will evoke the era you’re after.